Woodworking with Children: Lots of Pictures

It’s high time I share a few more pictures of my children working (and playing) in my shop space.  The following pictures are from the previous year and a half.

All four kids at the bench checking out various tools.  The youngest one has some catching up to do, but I think it’s best to start ’em young.

We’re making a marking gauge with a laminated fence.  Here is K spreading glue for the lamination.

Boring the hole for the notched dowel, A takes a turn at the brace.

K uses a rasp to round over the top of the fence.

Sometimes, though, it’s more fun to play in the sawdust.

M thinks that making shavings (with mom’s help) is also fascinating.

Little brother R would rather explore the tool chest.

Eggbeater drills are ideal tools for small hands.

The sisters are carefully considering the layout of a carving project.

Making cuts carefully with carving gouges–at 4 and 6 years old, respectively.

I haven’t been building much in the shop lately–except relationships.  And that’s the most important thing to build.

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6 Responses to Woodworking with Children: Lots of Pictures

  1. Good stuff, I have been involving my five year old in my hand tool shop, and last year I got him his own tool chest (a six board chest out of pine) with a starter set of hand tools. he’s doing pretty well down there, and seems to enjoy coming down with me.

  2. Wilbur Pan says:

    Hi Steve,

    In the first picture I was worried for a second that you were employing your youngest as a veneer clamping solution. Great post.

  3. Bob Jones says:

    A boy? I thought it was just 3 girls. All three of my girls love their egg beater drills. 2 of them can use it pretty well (the 2 year old hasn’t gotten it yet).

  4. meeteyorites says:

    Is this similar to “Welding with Children,” ? –Tim Gautreaux

  5. Alli says:

    Great pictures! Seeing your kids working with you reminds me that the kids here aren’t as helpless as we imagine them to be.

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